USAA: Insurance for the Military

By: Torin Wetzel

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https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.usaa.mobile.android.usaa

 

USAA is an insurance company made for military members and their families. This case study will explore the different ways USAA trains its employees to deal with the situations and unique needs of the customers while keeping the employees happy. USAA uses unique strategies in order to get their employees acclimated to the type of customers they have. Working with military members and their families is much different than the norm, so it is extremely important to USAA that their employees be fully trained to deal with every situation that may occur. “In a recent study by Forrester Research, USAA received the top rating from customers, a full 81% of whom said they believed the company does what’s best for them rather than for the bottom line” (McGregor 05). This number proves how hard USAA works in order to achieve what is best for its customers by training employees to be able to work for their best needs. USAA also finds way to gain employee trust and give them a sense of importance and recognition.

The USAA standard contains the following cores values which outline the full standard of the company; service, loyalty, honesty, and integrity. These four core values are the base for the entire standard. A big part of USAA is building trust and keeping the company first. Building trust with the company as well as the clients is very important with insurance, the employees have to be able to live up to their word. Keeping the company first aligns with this as well because an employee must be able to do what is best for the company and its clients at all times, adapting to the various needs. The other standards that are involved with USAA include, creating conditions for people to succeed, creating diverse perspectives, and innovation. Being able to help people to succeed is important with pushing ideas that will benefit the customer as well as sharing knowledge with transparency. Diverse perspectives are extremely important to have in USAA as well, because these military members come from very different backroads and it important to be able to relate to them in some ways. The last standard is innovation and that is the ability to bring new ideas forward and take smart risks for the better and possible evolution of the company.

The USAA standard aligns with the utilitarian perspective of ethical decision making. The reason being is because they USAA standard prides itself on transparency and relationships with customers. Honesty and integrity are two of the core values and they base the ethical behavior by action. The unique training of USAA definitely provides employees with ways to interact with customers ethically. The training provides the employees with experiences that show how difficult military life is every day. These eye opening experiences help the employees to relate to the customers more, and understand where they are coming from. This makes for a much better relationship between employees and customers, which in turn creates more satisfaction on both ends. It’s not hard to understand why USAA employees enjoy their work so much, while still keeping customers happy.

 

An organization in which I am a part of is the men’s basketball team at Ashland University. Ethical standards that I would include for a code of ethical would include; responsibility to the team, unity with team members and coaches, respect to the organization, and trust in the process. Responsibility to the team comes from being accountable for you actions that involve yourself, or team members. Team members have the responsibility to be to practices, games and training on time, and have the right attitude. They also have the responsibility to be the best member of the team that they can be, while representing the team in the right way. Unity with team members and coaches is extremely important for the team’s success. A team with strong chemistry and unity can often beat a more talented team. Getting along with teammates and spending time with one another is part of being in the organization. You have to have a vested interest in the coaches and the players. They are your family away from your real family, and team chemistry will help to make everyone succeed. With unity comes trusting each member has your back, a team that is fearless as a whole can accomplish great things. Respect in the organization comes with trying the best you can to represent your team and in this case school in the best way that you can. You have to respect the team members and the coaches in order to learn anything and to get better. You have to respect the whole organization in order to truly do your best to represent it in a god light. Lastly. To trust the process is very important. A member must trust that the coaches and other players have their best interest at hand and will work together to achieve the goal. The ,members have to understand that while it may not be fun to run and do conditioning at practice, it will pay off when they play games. To understand the end goal and what it takes to get there is very important.

New members of the team are trained by showing them how to abide by the ethical standards. Having leaders to take them under their wings and show them the way things are supposed to be done. Show them the respect the other players have for the organization and teach them the unity that the team has. New members often just need to wait back and watch for a little while to understand the culture of the team and the dynamics at which the team works. Once they understand the values that the team as a whole has, that is when it is easier for them to join.

 

Fleurke, B. X. (2009, January). Walking a Mile in the Shoes of your Customer. Retrieved October 17, 2016, from http://www.corporate-ethics.org/walking-a-mile-in-the-shoes-of-your-customer/

Long, N. (n.d.). What Are Ethical Standards in the Workplace? Retrieved October 17, 2016, from http://smallbusiness.chron.com/ethical-standards-workplace-11576.html

McGregor, J. (2005, October 1). Employee Innovator: USAA. Retrieved October 15, 2016, from https://www.fastcompany.com/53782/employee-innovator-usaa

Shevory, K. (2014, September 01). Boot Camp for Bankers. Retrieved October 16, 2016, from http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2014/09/01/boot-camp-for-bankers/?_r=0

PDF: https://www.usaajobs.com/docs/USAA-Standard.pdf

 

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